Tet Offensive

AP photographer Art Greenspon capturing injured soldiers during the Battle of Hue

AP photographer Art Greenspon capturing injured soldiers during the Battle of Hue

Four years into the war, the U.S. military strategy against North Vietnam army showed little progress, as bombing campaigns resulted in little advancement, while ground troops getting baffled by the guerrilla war tactics being applied by the Vietcong, an organization based in South Vietnam fighting against South Vietnam and U.S. forces.

 

 

 

 

The Viet Cong biggest blow to the U.S. occurred on January 30, 1968 on Tet, the Vietnamese New Year, when Viet Cong and Norther Vietnamese troops attacked several Southern Vietnam territories surprising U.S. military personnel who were unprepared for the invasion.

 

Execution of Viet Cong suspect Nguyen Van Lem by South Vietnamese General Gen. Nguyen Ngoc. Photo taken by Eddie Adams

Execution of Viet Cong suspect Nguyen Van Lem by South Vietnamese General Gen. Nguyen Ngoc. Photo taken by Eddie Adams

My Lai Massacre in 1968

My Lai Massacre in 1968

While U.S. and South Vietnam troops were able to regain much of the lost territory back from the Offensive, it prompted Commanding General William Westmoreland to order additional troops to Vietnam.  With U.S. fatalities rising and reports of the atrocities by both side of the war, including the My Lai Massacre, a increasing number of Americans began to disapprove the U.S. involvement in Vietnam.

 

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